Softlang Book -- The art

The art in the software language book authored by Ralf Lämmel.

Cover art

cover.png

Cover artwork:
Wojciech Kwasnik, The Tower of Software Languages, 2017.
With the assistance of Archina Void and Daniel Dünker.
Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.
Artwork DMT, acrylic, 2006 by Matt Sheehy is quoted with the artist’s permission.

Per-chapter art - an example

The following artwork appears on the cover of Chapter 5, "A Suite of Metaprogramming Scenarios".

cordy.jpg

Artwork Credits for Chapter Opening: This work by Wojciech Kwasnik is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. This artwork quotes the artwork DMT, acrylic, 2006 by Matt Sheehy with the artist’s permission. This work also quotes https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sunset_at_Montmajour_1888_Van_Gogh.jpg, subject to the attribution “Vincent Van Gogh: Sunset at Montmajour (1888) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.” This work artistically morphes an image, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Cordy, showing the person honored, subject to the attribution “By Cordyj (talk) (Uploads) - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31348050.”

The art concept

I kindly acknowledge the artistic work of Wojciech Kwasnik and his collaborators on the book’s cover and the per-chapter artwork. I very much enjoyed the endeavor–a “deep art” approach. The artwork on the book’s cover shows a tower (inspired by the Tower of Babel), suggesting a notion of a “Tower of Software Languages”. The tower is the output of a neural algorithm applied to a simpler (computed) tower and used a style image by Matt Sheehy for “morphing”. “Tron design” was applied at the border of the tower’s shape. The images for the per-chapter artwork were derived based on the following pattern: the image of a computer scientist to be honored was composed with artwork by Vincent van Gogh for the person’s background; artwork by Matt Sheehy (the same as for the book’s cover) was used to morph the person’s clothes and “Tron design” was applied at the border of the person’s shape. Thus, there is a constructive similarity between the “Tower of Software Languages” and the morphed images of the persons.